Sony, Sharp and Philips are on the bandwagon and will release TVs based on Android TV in 2015. Android TV combines streaming services, apps, and a game console in one platform. It will also be available in small TV streamer boxes.
LG has a range of new OLED TVs coming out in 2014 as well as new Ultra HD and Full HD TVs. LG is also introducing a new webOS-based Smart TV platform that looks promising. Could 2014 be the year where LG establishes itself as the leading Korean TV innovator?
Panasonic is introducing their new AX900 with “plasma-like picture quality” and a range of new Full HD models – some very basic, some with advanced features. Panasonic is also introducing a new Smart TV user interface called Life+ that recommends relevant content.
In 2014, Philips will introduce its first TV with the new Android-based Smart TV platform. They will also launch Ultra HD TVs and TVs with twin tuners, Miracast screen mirroring and a new Cloud TV app that streams TV channels over the internet.
See FlatpanelsHD's list of TV and monitor recommendations. The list is updated continuously Last update: March 12, 2014.
We bring you a full overview of Samsung's 2014 TV line-up. Samsung has a range of new curved & flat Ultra HD & Full HD TVs. But plasma TVs are almost dead and there are no new OLED TVs in sight.
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Microsoft wants to make touch panels faster
Microsoft wants to make touchscreens much faster


By Rasmus Larsen (@flatpanels)
12 Mar 2012

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All touch screens suffer from a delay – or input lag. Microsoft's research team wants to make touch screens much faster and has set a goal to reduce input lag on touch screens to just 1 ms (millisecond).

1 ms touch panels

Microsoft’s Applied Sciences Group conducts research into new technologies, including touchscreens. They dream about a future where touchscreens in smartphones & tablets will be lightning fast.

Microsoft wants to make touch screens much faster
Microsoft wants to make touch screens much faster


Microsoft notes that most touch screens in tablets and smartphones suffer from input lag (delay) of 100 ms or more. In the video at the bottom Microsoft demonstrates the difference between 100, 50, 10 and 1 ms - and the difference is more significant than you might think. The demonstration has not been conducted on an actual touchscreen but instead on a surface with a projector below. It reveals that Microsoft still has some work to do but the official goal is to reach 1 ms in the future.

Microsoft’s premise that smartphones and tablets suffer from 100 ms input lag or more is not false. Input lag is provided on the specifications sheet and is rarely measured. Input lag is also affected by processor power and operating system and for example Tom's Hardware notes that the iPhone 4 had input lag of 120-140 ms but that the iPhone 4S only suffers from 80-90 ms. This might suggest that the added processor power in the iPhone 4S has a lot to say. We should also point out that input lag typically increases for the second, third and fourth touch command in a sequence.

The operating system can also prove to be a bottleneck. One Android programmer reveals how the Android operating system does not prioritize touch commands. Sometimes touch commands are queued which results in lag. This happens because the Android system was originally designed for physical buttons and later upgraded with touch capabilities.

See Microsoft's video demonstration below and judge for yourself:





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